In Arizona:

Arizona Republic/12News (11/4/13) Scottsdale’s financial disparity a sign of the times

This sports investigation tells the tale of two high schools, separated by eight miles, with vastly different financial situations. Coronado High School was once a sports powerhouse, but now only receives $25,672 from tax donations for athletics. On the other side of town, Chaparral High School got $195,000 for athletics from tax donations, and its boosters and parents “raised more than $1 million to put in synthetic turf and build a two-story, 7,500-square-foot football fieldhouse that has a special wing for the boosters,” according to The Arizona Republic.

The first part of this investigation into high school sports in the Valley looked at open enrollment and attracting talented players to teams. The Republic also made an interactive map of schools’ championship wins from 1960 to 2013.

Nationally:

ProPublica (11/1/13) “Everything That’s Happened Since Supreme Court Ruled on Voting Rights Act

In June 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act, which required certain states, mostly in the South (Arizona was one of them), to get pre-clearance for new voting laws. The Court said this provision was unconstitutional according to the 10th Amendment.

In this followup, ProPublica revisits states that previously fell under Section 5 jurisdiction and how things have changed since the provision was deemed unconstitutional. An interactive map shows the states affected, and the story outlined each state’s changes to election laws since the Supreme Court ruling.

Midwest Center for Investigative Reporting (11/4/13) “As deaths add up, farmers ‘walk the grain’ unprotected

The Midwest Center for Investigative Reporting reviewed deaths and accidents related to farmers and grain bins in the Midwest. They found that, “So far this year, farms in Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Nebraska, Ohio and South Dakota have reported grain-bin deaths or injuries.” These deaths can be considered preventable because OSHA guidelines state that no farmer should be inside a grain bin in the first place.

This story is a part of a larger series on death and injuries on farms called “Matter of Seconds: Injury and death on America’s farms.” The series investigates the deaths and injuries themselves, as well as safety regulations related to farms. It also includes a map that details where the accidents occurred in Illinois.